Author Archives: 3rd1000yrs

About 3rd1000yrs

Former Marketing Coord. at public radio, former programmer/board op, & computers, ESL teacher.

Start an iNet Radio Station

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Lonely in Hong Kong (or elsewhere)? Start an Internet radio station

Lonely in Hong Kong (or elsewhere)? Start an Internet radio station

Radio LantauAre you working abroad? Do you now live in some wonderful city that is fascinating and different, but also pretty difficult to navigate through, socially speaking? Well, one solution is to do what Michael Egerton, now an expat resident of Hong Kong did: start an Internet radio station.

Egerton hails from the Netherlands. He lives on Hong Kong’s biggest island: Lantau. Hence no surprise that he dubbed his station Radio Lantau. The South China Morning Post has a great profile of the operation. It caters to around 12,000 listeners, many of whom miss the kind of tunes they heard back home. Comments from Egerton’s fans attest to this:

“His show is pretty much the only Hong Kong programme I listen to. Old school hip hop on Hong Kong radio is really not happening.”

“A lot of music he plays, I would say he plays for western listeners … stuff that reminds me of back home, back in the day.”

Having spent some weeks in Hong Kong not that long ago, I can corroborate these quotes. Hong Kong AM/FM listeners are really into talk radio. No surprise there. The place is so intensely political because of its fraught relationship with the People’s Republic of China, hence the yearning for 24/7 commentary. The other radio genre they love is (obviously) “Cantopop” (or HK pop as it’s also called), which is lots of fun but very idiosyncratic.

So if you are looking for the latest western stuff, music-wise, you are going to have to resort to your own devices, figuratively and literally in Radio Lantau’s case.


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Want a new station?

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http://transom.org/2012/youre-on-the-air/

Nan Rubin may be able to help you.
She was part of a Strategic Process imposed on KPFK in 1986.  But Lorenzo Milam’s off-titled Sex in Broadcasting book was the handbook for getting on the air for many years.

You’re On the Air!

onair_FEATURED

My greatest personal satisfaction in a long public broadcasting career has come from building a radio station from scratch. Flipping the switch and filling that empty space on the radio dial with brand new sounds for the very first time — nothing can match it.

I’m close to social security age now, but signing my first station on the air in 1975 was one of the biggest thrills of my life.

Cover of Sex and Broadcasting

My first radio station was WAIF 88.3 FM in Cincinnati, one of a wave of community stations in Atlanta, Madison, Memphis, St. Louis, Tampa and elsewhere that hit the airwaves between 1970 and 1980 as part of the counter-culture and anti-Vietnam War era, guided in part by Lorenzo Milam and Jeremy Lansman’s irreverent station-building guide “Sex and Broadcasting.” We were licensed to Stepchild Radio of Cincinnati, Inc. and our bumper stickers read “Out of the Ordinary Radio.”

Building a radio station takes a serious commitment. First, you have to set-up a non-profit organization so you can legally apply for a broadcast license and also raise money. At the same time, you have to do a technical search to find an open frequency on the FM dial, plus locate a real physical place to put a transmitter and antenna. Then you are ready to fill out an FCC application requesting the frequency, and the FCC sits on it for months while they make sure everything meets their requirements.

In the meantime, you become a community organizer, holding a gazillion meetings to plan station operations, implement decision-making, devise programming schedules, scout out broadcasting equipment and studio locations, and ask people to give you money for a radio station that is just an idea and doesn’t exist yet. You are also holding your breath and hoping no other group has the same idea and applied for the same frequency.

…………

 

KPFK current jobs 30-07-2016

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I don’t know how long it will take, but I believe they are reactivating the hiring process for a Program Director at KPFK.

 

JOB DESCRIPTION

TITLE:                 BUSINESS MANAGER

STATUS:              REGULAR PART TIME — EXEMPT/CONFIDENTIAL

SITE:                    KPFK-PACIFICA RADIO, North Hollywood CA (Los Angeles Metro)

BENEFITS:         MEDICAL, DENTAL, LIFE, DISABILITY (Upon Completion of Introductory Status)

CORPORATION:The Pacifica Foundation is a non-profit agency providing educational services. Mission: To establish a foundation organized and operated exclusively for education purposes no part of the net earnings of which inures to the benefit of any member of the Foundation. Corporation services are provided in Berkeley/North Hollywood, CA, Washington, D.C., Houston, TX and New York, NY.

DEFINITION: The Business Manager will work under the supervision of Pacifica’s Chief Financial Officer and/or Controller, and administratively under the station’s General Manager. The Business Manager is responsible for payroll and payroll reporting; accounting/bookkeeping for KPFK, financial reports to local management and local station board, Pacifica National Office (PNO) management,  This staff will also be responsible for 1099 preparation, audit support; account reconciliation, credit card processing/deposit, and coordinate with Membership and Development departments as necessary and other duties assigned. This is a full-time exempt confidential position, with all work to be performed on site.

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES:

1.        Process, review and submit station’s payroll information to Pacifica National Office (PNO)

2.        Maintain the station’s personnel files, insurance and benefit plans, update payroll and personnel info as necessary

3.       Maintain union dues, seniority pay and other union-related benefit plans and reports

4.        Track and administer employees’ earnings records and process employee garnishments and voluntary deductions

5.        Review and process of Accounts Payable invoices/bills and other disbursements

6.        Update accounts payable schedules and vendor files/information, reconcile outstanding A/P against general ledger.

7.        Schedule, secure approval and pay station obligation and payables

8.        Prepare and maintain monthly ledger, coordinate with the PNO in generating financial statements monthly, quarterly for use by local management and local station board and committees.

9.        Prepare and maintain grant and special fund-raising project worksheets as necessary.

10.        Collect and review 1099 information — maintain associated records.

11.        Coordinate with Membership / Development Departments in recording cash deposits and station’s income and revenue

12.     Maintain files for deposits and other cash receipts, prepare bank reconciliation

13.     Assist the station’s General Manager in developing annual station budget

14.     Assist in the preparation of year-end audit schedules and reconciliation and compilation of supporting documentation for external auditors and the PNO finance staff.

15.     Assure that office systems are maintained and functioning.

16.     Troubleshoot accounting software and computer hardware as necessary.

17.     Follow and implement Foundation, KPFK, and PNO policies and procedures.

Job descriptions are subject to change without notice based on the needs of the KPFK and/or the PNO.

QUALIFICATIONS:

Education: One year certificate from college or technical school; or 2 — 3 years accounting course work

Experience: Progressive experience in A/R, A/P, Payroll and other accounting activities preferred.

Skills and Abilities: Ability to calculate figures and amounts such as discounts, interest, commission, proportions percentages. Ability to apply concepts of basic algebra. Common sense of understanding to carry out instructions furnished in written, oral, or diagram form. Excellent problem solving variables where only limited standardized instructions exist. Aptitude to read and interpret documents such as financial statements, operating and maintenance instructions, and procedures manuals. Ability to produce routine reports and correspondence. Strong computer skills, Great Plains or any accounting software exposure, spreadsheets, word processing, internet. Must be customer service oriented and able to relate well with management, staff, board, vendors and the general public. Strong ability to prioritize and multitask.

Ability to think clearly and manage multiple changing priorities, and remain pleasant and positive. Requires critical thinking and ability to support people with difficult challenges. Requires good judgment.

License Required: Employment is contingent upon proof of eligibility to work, 21 years of age or older, verification of degree/credentials, satisfactory health exam, credit check, agree to uphold all of the Pacifica Foundation Policies and Procedures, Confidentiality Agreement, Policy on Outside Employment, Policy on Prohibiting/Preventing Workplace Violence, Policy to Prohibit Harassment in the Workplace, Policy on Ethics, adhere to Drug-Free Workplace Policy, compliance with Workplace injury and Illness Prevention Policies, and compliance with HIPAA Rules and Regulations, (by signature).

THE PACIFICA FOUNDATION IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

Pacifica Foundation does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, ancestry, religious creed, national origin, ethnicity, gender, age, marital status, equal pay, disability, medical condition, sexual orientation, and genetic information. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply.

 


 

JOB TITLE: Program Director
Original Posting Date 8/24/11
Program Director sought for listener-sponsored, free speech radio KPFK-FM 90.7 FM Los Angeles. Candidates should be experienced.

The program Director Search is currently on hold. A new search will be launched soon. Please check back for info this position.

 

Pacifica Foundation/KPFK is an equal employment opportunity and does not discriminate against otherwise qualified applicants on the basis of race, color, creed, religion, ancestry, age, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national origin, disability or handicap, or veteran status.  Pacifica Foundation/KPFK provides reasonable accommodations to applicants and employees with disabilities.  Applicants seeking reasonable accommodations in the hiring process should contact the General Manager.

KPFK and Pacifica are founded upon a Mission Statement, which to this day remains unique in radio broadcasting:

  • To contribute to a lasting understanding between nations and between individuals of all nations, races, creeds and colors
  • To explore the causes of conflict; to promote the study of political and economic problems, and of the causes of religious, philosophical and racial antagonisms
  • To provide outlets for the creative skills and energies of the community and to serve the cultural welfare
  • To obtain access to news sources not commonly brought together in the same medium; and to employ varied sources to present accurate and comprehensive news on all matters that vitally affect our community

BACKGROUND OF THE PACIFICA FOUNDATION

Pacifica Foundation is a 501(c)(3) radio broadcasting organization with five member stations in New York, Houston, Washington D.C., Los Angeles, and Berkeley, California. We employ 179 full-time staff and each station also utilizes an average of 200 unpaid staff. We are a membership-based organization and our five stations have approximately 95,000 members nationwide. In September, 2009, members in each of the five signal areas will elect nine (9) Listener-member delegates and three (3) staff delegates to sit on their local station boards (LBSes). The returns of candidate choices by Listener-members nearly always exceed the quorum of 10%.

KPFK Changes 8-9 pm Lineup

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http://www.laobserved.com/archive/2016/06/kpfk_dropping_deadline_la.php

KPFK dropping ‘Deadline LA’ show after 20 years?*

kpfk-on-air.jpgMakeshift on-air sign observed on my last visit to KPFK. Photo: LA Observed

[July 4 update: “Deadline LA” is staying on the air.]

For at least 20 years, KPFK has been airing a more or less weekly radio show devoted to talking about the news media in Los Angeles and beyond. For most if not all of that time, Barbara Osborn has been the host. Since she has become director of communications for Supervisor Sheila Kuehl, the show has been more in the hands of Howard Blume and Gail Holland, both of them staff writers at the Los Angeles Times. I have been on several times, and the show has tackled issues on the LA media scene from many directions through the years.

Anyway, the show’s run is coming to an end. [* Update: Maybe not. Further discussions are ensuing. More to come.]

On July 11 the Pacifica station at 90.7 FM will be dropping several shows and adding more Spanish-language programming. The note from KPFK general manager Leslie Radford makes it sound as if the shows could have gone on if the program manager had presented the boss with some options, and there is also the possibility of a future podcast.

As of July 11, Indy Media on Air, Deadline L.A., Treasures of the West, Poets’ Cafe, and Theatreworks will no longer be broadcast on KPFK 90.7FM.
In an effort to diversify our programming further, we are complying with the Pacifica National Board mandate to increase our Spanish-language programming by five hours. We will be doing that between 8:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. Monday-Friday.

On June 15, I requested the Interim Program Director give me options to re-arrange the existing programming to accommodate this change. He hasn’t presented me with those options, so I’m left with simply cutting the programming in this timeslot.

I understand this is harsh, but please understand that it isn’t intended to be disrespectful of your contributions to KPFK, nor is it a judgment on the quality of your show. I am very grateful for all you’ve done for KPFK. It is simply that I have no options except to make this cut across the strip. If you would like your show to continue as a podcast, please talk to Interim Program Director Alan Minsky.

Leslie Radford
General Manager, KPFK 90.7FM
Gerente General de KPFK 90.7 FM

KPFK past manager, homeless crusader

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http://www.laobserved.com/archive/2016/07/mollie_lowery_70_longtime.php

Obituaries

Mollie Lowery, 70, longtime angel of Skid Row

Mollie-Lowery.jpgMollie Lowery. Photo: lacatholicworker.org.

Steve Lopez has written a lovely column on his friend Mollie Lowery, the Skid Row organizer and housing advocate and co-founder of the LAMP Community. Lowery died Monday at home in Highland Park at age 70, after having cancer. Lowery had helped Lopez with his column subject Nathaniel Ayers back when Ayers was homeless on the streets of downtown. From Steve’s column yesterday:

For decades in Los Angeles, no one was more dedicated to comforting the sick, the destitute and the forgotten than Mollie Lowery.
Mayors, supervisors and other public officials sought her out for policy advice.

Countless addled, suffering souls who could not help themselves, or would not be helped by others, were reeled in by Lowery. Some of them joined her team, roaming the streets of Los Angeles on a quest to help more people.

Tall and blade-thin, Lowery carried herself with great humility and spoke softly, but worked fiercely.

She was determined to do, as she put it, whatever it takes, for as long as it takes, to help homeless people — especially those with severe mental illness — rebuild their lives.

From the LA Times obituary:

Lowery was a fierce advocate for and friend of those she worked to help. In 1985, she founded Los Angeles Men’s Place, a skid row drop-in center for people with mental illness, and later helped expand it to Lamp Community, which provided permanent supportive housing that included counseling and other social services.Lowery served as director of programs and then executive director of Housing Works, another homeless services organization, from 2006 to 2015, and continued as a consultant to the nonprofit until a few weeks before she died.

Mike Neely, chair of the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority Commission, said that Lowery “was one of the first people that said that homeless mentally ill people don’t have to be condemned to life on the street.”

Lowery grew up in the Valley and attended Bishop Alemany High School. She received a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling from USC. Lowery, who briefly became a Catholic nun, got into community organizing with the Ocean Park Community Center in Santa Monica. Lowery and philanthropist Frank Rice founded the Los Angeles Men’s Place, or LAMP, in 1985.

Some tweets paying tribute to Lowery.

From 2012, Coalitions vying

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Progressives scratch heads over Pacifica radio hire of Jackson Lewis

KPFAThe KPFA Worker website says that the Pacifica Foundation has retained the law firm of Jackson Lewis to manage some of its legal affairs. The foundation owns listener supported station KPFA in Berkeley, and four similar non-commercial stations in Los Angeles, New York, Washington, D.C. and Houston.“We see the entry of Jackson Lewis as a declaration of war on the unions that represent Pacifica workers,” wrote KPFA’s union stewards to their employer last week. “We fear it will lead to unnecessary legal expenses the network can ill afford, sour Pacifica’s already dismal relationship with its union workers, and alienate many listener-supporters who do not want their donations to be handed over to one of organized labor’s greatest enemies in the United States.”

KPFA’s paid staff is represented by the Communications Workers of America. Jackson Lewis is widely regarded as a management law firm that practices “union avoidance.” The pro-union American Rights at Work website cites numerous instances of the aggressive stance that the firm allegedly counsels for its clients, among them Borders Books.

[Go here for the full article:  http://www.radiosurvivor.com/2012/03/20/progressives-scratch-heads-over-pacifica-radio-hire-of-jackson-lewis/

KPFK Michelle Alexander frequently featured

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Below are excerpts from Michelle Alexander’s article in The Nation titled “Why Hillary Clinton Doesn’t Deserve the Black Vote.”

“[Hillary Clinton is] facing a democratic socialist who promises a political revolution that will bring universal healthcare, a living wage, an end to rampant Wall Street greed, and the dismantling of the vast prison state—many of the same goals that Martin Luther King Jr. championed at the end of his life. Even so, black folks are sticking with the Clinton brand. …”On the campaign trail, Bill Clinton made the economy his top priority. … In practice, however, he capitulated entirely to the right-wing backlash against the civil-rights movement and embraced former president Ronald Reagan’s agenda on race, crime, welfare, and taxes—ultimately doing more harm to black communities than Reagan ever did. …

“Bill Clinton presided over the largest increase in federal and state prison inmates of any president in American history. … He supported the 100-to-1 sentencing disparity for crack versus powder cocaine, which produced staggering racial injustice in sentencing and boosted funding for drug-law enforcement.

“Clinton championed the idea of a federal ‘three strikes’ law in his 1994 State of the Union address and, months later, signed a $30 billion crime bill that created dozens of new federal capital crimes, mandated life sentences for some three-time offenders, and authorized more than $16 billion for state prison grants and the expansion of police forces. …

When Clinton left office in 2001, the United States had the highest rate of incarceration in the world. Human Rights Watch reported that in seven states, African Americans constituted 80 to 90 percent of all drug offenders sent to prison, even though they were no more likely than whites to use or sell illegal drugs. … All of the presidents since 1980 have contributed to mass incarceration, but as Equal Justice Initiative founder Bryan Stevenson recently observed, ‘President Clinton’s tenure was the worst.’ …

“In her support for the 1994 crime bill, [Hillary Clinton] used racially coded rhetoric to cast black children as animals. ‘They are not just gangs of kids anymore,’ she said. ‘They are often the kinds of kids that are called “super-predators.” No conscience, no empathy. We can talk about why they ended up that way, but first we have to bring them to heel.’ …

“As unemployment rates sank to historically low levels for white Americans in the 1990s, the jobless rate among black men in their 20s who didn’t have a college degree rose to its highest level ever. … Why is this not common knowledge? Because government statistics like poverty and unemployment rates do not include incarcerated people. …

“To make matters worse, the federal safety net for poor families was torn to shreds by the Clinton administration in its effort to ‘end welfare as we know it.’ … Experts and pundits disagree about the true impact of welfare reform, but one thing seems clear: Extreme poverty doubled to 1.5 million in the decade and a half after the law was passed. …

“Perhaps most alarming, Clinton also made it easier for public-housing agencies to deny shelter to anyone with any sort of criminal history (even an arrest without conviction) and championed the ‘one strike and you’re out’ initiative, which meant that families could be evicted from public housing because one member (or a guest) had committed even a minor offense. …

Hillary Clinton is still singing the same old tune in a slightly different key. She is arguing that we ought not be seduced by Bernie’s rhetoric because we must be ‘pragmatic,’ ‘face political realities,’ and not get tempted to believe that we can fight for economic justice and win.”


Here’s a quick way to help build the movement: Forward this email to all Californians and ask them to
1) Read Michelle Alexander’s full article.
2) Vote for Senator Bernie Sanders in the Democratic primary.
3) Sign our petition asking Superdelegates to vote the way the voters of their state vote.

— The RootsAction.org team

P.S. RootsAction is an independent online force endorsed by Jim Hightower, Barbara Ehrenreich, Cornel West, Daniel Ellsberg, Glenn Greenwald, Naomi Klein, Bill Fletcher Jr., Laura Flanders, former U.S. Senator James Abourezk, Coleen Rowley, Frances Fox Piven, Lila Garrett, Phil Donahue, Sonali Kolhatkar, and many others.

www.RootsAction.org

KPFK has had a good music show by and for youth for 8 years now

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ksounwv7_11_15_EP325annivsoundwaveskpfk

Soundwaves Radio

 Late Friday Nights 2-4am on 90.7fm KPFK Los Angeles and kpfk.org with DJ’s SeanO, Val the Vandle & Francesca Harding.
Soundwaves Radio strives to bring you the best in all forms of music both new and old. Live guest DJ set’s and producer performances as well as extensive interviews with artists from all over the globe. 2-4am early Saturday morning on 90.7FM KPFK Los Angeles and Streaming worldwide at www.kpfk.org.

FOLLOW US
www.soundcloud.com/soundwaveskpfk
www.twitter.com/soundwaveskpfk
www.instagram.com/soundwaveskpfk

Contact us at: soundwaveskpfk@gmail.com
ksounwvsextendedfamily
ksounwvsmixinMCksounwav7thannivseano
Seano
KSoundwavesDJ Nonchalant Savant and DJ Val the Vandle

KPFK (KPCC) Billboard

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KPCC radio billboard ‘Occupied’ by KPFK radio listener

by Lalo Alcaraz on March 9, 2012 in Cultura, El Now, Las Fotos

Much L.A. radio hay was made over the placing of a KPCC 89.3 FM billboard advertising its “Ideas not ideology” slogan practically on top my radio station’s studios at KPFK 90.7 FM, where I host the Pocho Hour of Power every Friday at 4 PM.

As I walked in today, I was alerted that someone had replaced the KPCC billboard with our own KPFK billboard. Didn’t know we had such a substantial advertising budget.

Nice job! (above photo by KPFK’s Ernesto Arce) Here’s the before picture:

http://www.pocho.com/kpcc-radio-billboard-occupied-by-kpfk-radio-listener/

Note: David Barsamian-Alternative Radio

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Just ahead of a speaking engagement in Kansas City, David Barsamian will be on the phone on a pledge drive edition of Tell Somebody on October 9, 2014, 9:15 – 10:00 am Central Time on 90.1 FM KKFI, streaming at www.kkfi.org.
https://www.facebook.com/events/707444282663151/?ref_notif_type=plan_mall_activity&source=1

OCT9

Thu 9:10 AM in CDT · on your radio dial 90.1 FM KKFI
4 people interested · 15 people going

Like

Regular Producer for Pacifica and KPFK

Article on WPFW fighting or . . .

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http://www.counterpunch.org/2006/06/02/can-pacifica-live-up-to-its-promise/

Telling Facts and Naming Names
Since 1993

Can Pacifica Live Up to Its Promise?

Pacifica was founded by radical pacifists who refused to fight even in World War II; nor were they content to wash their hands of the situation and be quietly hidden away in camps. Rather they wanted to disseminate their ideas; so after World War II, they established Pacifica radio, in the words of its mission, to “gather and disseminate information on the causes of conflict between” and to “contribute to a lasting understanding between nations and individuals of all nations, races, creeds and colors.” Hopefully the Pacifica board, which meets this weekend in New York City, will live up to this legacy.

In the late 90s and early in this decade, problems long-festering Pacifica spilled out and resulted in a series of lockouts, lawsuits and conflicts that gripped the network, which owns five stations. By the time the cataclysmic events of 9-11 happened, the network was in a state of internal war; crucially, its flagship program, “Democracy Now!”, was eerily being censored from Pacifica’s stations in New York City and Washington, D.C.

This occurred largely because “Democracy Now!”, unlike much of the other programming on those stations, sought to report on moves by the Pacifica national board, which seemed intent on mainstreaming the network, and possibly selling off parts of it. There was some indication that these actions could even have been motivated by goals of personal profit for board members (the stations are now worth hundreds of millions of dollars). . . .”

for more go to:  http://www.counterpunch.org/2006/06/02/can-pacifica-live-up-to-its-promise/

KPFK 2015 Election Results

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KPFK Listener Delegates
Jan Goodman
Grace Aaron
Fred Blair
Kenneth Aaron
Sharon Brown
Myla Reson
Mansoor Sabbagh
Steve Kaiser
Roberta Eidman
Lydia Brazon
Christian Beck
Leslie Fox
Michael Novick
Sandy Childs
Write-in (Dorothy Reik)
Charles Fredricks
Aryana Gladney
Reza Pour

KPFK Staff Delegates
Fernando Velazquez
Maggie LePique
Jonathan Alexander
Tejvir “Tej” Grewall
Steve Pride
Ali Lexa
I think I was 10th for 6 seats.

KPFK Election Results

KPFK reminiscence

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January 9, 2016, at 11:56pm
Joseph K. Adams
Joseph K. Adams When I was there, we had a village. We shared meals, some lived with each other, some brought food to the station (some Johnnie Otis buffets were intense), did picnic jaunts to the old zoo at Griffith park, met in the conference room to talk about programming, episodes of upcoming shows… even when you didn’t agree with someone, there was respect and communication.

On 13 September 2015 at 06:17, Joseph Adams wrote:

Re: Johnny Otis- “I think he was earlier than that [’78]. My first time in the new building was March, 6th or 7th of 1972. I had been at the old building before that, but Johnnie and his clan were there when I arrived. I know because they always brought LOTS of food down to the studio, and Shuggie was only about 14. But I have to say I don’t really know his tenure… Wikipedia says he was on KPFK in the 1980s, but I stopped being a programmer at K by 1978, and Johnny (that’s how Wikipedia spells it, but I thought it was spelled the other way – for many years) had been on for years by the time I was leaving.
I think the only connection I had …was a couple of guest spots I did for Roy – the last being about 2 weeks before the 1989 quake in San Francisco. ’78 sounds about right…  I came back from Phoenix after a failed relocation to find Chapel Perilous on the air….I was really very happy to find that when I came home with my tail between my legs, my work was being appreciated.
I haven’t tuned in for him for a while – is Something’s Happening still a going concern?
Don’t be too surprised at the events at K – when people show up, form a community and create something of value, cons and scavengers try to get what they want from it, even if it means the thing they are raiding dies.
On the other hand, it becomes a Golden Age we got to experience. People don’t believe me when I talk about my regular interactions with Harlan Ellison, Ray Bradbury, John Hartford, Roz and Howards parade of musical guests, Hour 25’s parade of writers, newsmakers of ‘the day’ and the things that were just going on… they think I’m delusional. But not about THAT.
I knew KPFK when it wasn’t painful.

kpfkRoyTuckman2kpfkjosephKAdams

?

Johnny Otis, Bill Gardner, Bernie Pearl, etc.

_________

Joseph Kessler Adams
Author of CLIMBING THE SPIRAL MOUNTAIN, SONG OF ORPHANS, NIALL’S DREAM, THE MAMA LAWFEVER, ASSASSINS, and LIVING IN THE HOUSE OF ANGELS. Available in paperback from Amazon, in ePub from Kindle, iBookstore, Nook and Kobo.

Article WBAI’s new team

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http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/democracy-duo-gonzalez-goodman-blast-new-wbai-team-article-1.376774

‘Democracy Now!’ duo, Gonzalez and Goodman, blast new WBAI team

Sunday, June 14, 2009, 9:17 PM
Daily News columnist Juan Gonzalez.DABIN FOR NEWS

Daily News columnist Juan Gonzalez.

Under normal circumstances,Amy Goodman and Daily News columnist Juan Gonzalez say, they’d be happy their daily “Democracy Now” show has moved from 9 a.m. to 8 a.m. on WBAI (99.5 FM).

But with WBAI having another of its periodic civil wars, they aren’t so sure.

Before the shift last week, co-hosts Goodman and Gonzalez sent a letter to acting general manager LaVarn Williamssaying that while the station has the right to air the program whenever it wishes, “This decision disturbs us deeply and we urge that it be reconsidered.”

Their concern, they say, involves the fact that moving “Democracy Now” is only one part of larger changes at WBAI, including the dismissal of station manager Anthony Riddle and program director Bernard White.

Critics of Riddle and White charged they had narrowed the station’s appeal, costing it listenership and revenue. White disputes those assertions, and his supporters have launched a campaign to “take back WBAI.”

Goodman and Gonzalez’s letter says firing White “lacked basic human consideration” and expresses concern that the new team is using “Democracy Now” as “a weapon against its opponents.” . . . .

KPFA, Pacifica, sell building?

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http://www.dailycal.org/2015/11/16/berkeley-based-radio-station-network-strategizes-financial-solutions-threat-default/

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2015

Berkeley-based radio station network strategizes financial solutions in threat of default

 BY | STAFF

A strategic planning working group — formed by the Pacifica Foundation Radio National Board of Directors, which oversees a network of nonprofit radio stations headquartered in Berkeley — held a planning meeting Thursday to try to keep its business alive.

At the meeting, the board’s leaders discussed the financial struggles ailing the company and potential contingency plans in case of short-term default. Jose Luis Fuentes-Roman, a member of the Pacifica National Board, or PNB, mentioned the selling of the Berkeley office — which serves as the national office — and financial swaps of broadcasting rights as possible ways to raise money in the face of mounting debt. …

KPFK Report to the Local Station Board

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Report to the Local Station Board by Leslie Radford

The whole thing:  http://kpfk.org/index.php/k2-categories/from-the-general-manager/9319-report-to-the-local-station-board-15-november-2015#.VkqbZHarQy5

Excerpts:

“…OCTOBER FUND DRIVE

Our fund drive came in at 80% of goal. Although that’s not enough, it is better than recent fund drives.  I previously distributed a spreadsheet of the amounts raised by each show per day to the LSB.

Looking forward, we will continue to ask our unpaid staff to take more of a role in the fund drive. The drives are particularly demanding on unpaid staff because they need to acquire premiums and prep for pitching, in addition to their regular contributions to the station. We also need to find ways to maximize fund raising in our overnight hours. We tried putting health and spirituality premiums in that stretch, but it didn’t result in enough revenue to keep the phone room open overnight.

Thanks to two volunteers, the copy room where stationary is stored, has been organized so that we can inventory what we have and what we need in advance of the tax season mailings.

The Halloween Monster’s Ball essentially broke even, but it did open up a solid connection with The Airliner for future events. Batacuda, organized by one of our unpaid collectives, was last night….”

[From me, Sue:  Why should the phone room be open overnight on weekdays, it’s not open overnight on weekends.]

Article KPFK Pacifica decline (3/2014)

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http://www.laweekly.com/news/left-wing-darling-pacifica-radio-is-sliding-into-the-abyss-4521218

3/21/14
“NIMBY-ism, but with microphones”

[ 159 ]March 23, 2014 |
kpfplewhill
Pacifica founder Lew Hill
[I am putting the latter part of this article first, it has lots of history (from a slightly skewed point of view, imho.]

“Before there was NPR, there was Pacifica.

Its founder was Lewis Hill, a pacifist and conscientious objector in World War II (during which he was assigned to a work camp “moving rocks from one side of the road to the other,” as he later put it), along with his friends Eleanor McKinney and Richard Moore, a married couple. Their first application for an AM-band radio license in working-class Richmond was rejected by the FCC. And so it was that the first station, KPFA, was launched as an FM station in 1949 in the university town of Berkeley.

“They wanted it to be more of a popular station than what it became,” says Matthew Lasar, a former Pacifica volunteer, who has written two books about the network. “It became sort of a station for people around UC Berkeley.”

FM was so new that KPFA had to give subscribers FM radios in order to be heard at all.

Although Hill’s goal was to promote pacifism and civil liberties, the concept was to give both sides time — and foster robust debate. Emerging conservative leaders such as National Review founder William F. Buckley Jr. and then–young Republican Caspar Weinberger were heard often. That changed when the McCarthy era set in, and Pacifica’s board of directors was dragged in front of a U.S. Senate subcommittee on subversive activities.

“They barely survived it, but once they did, their public justification was no longer ‘free speech for everyone,’ it was ‘the place where you hear the point of view you wouldn’t otherwise hear,’ ” Lasar says.

Pacifica flourished: KPFK launched in L.A. in 1959 (its 110,000-watt transmitter, perched atop Mount Wilson, is the most powerful antenna west of the Mississippi River; it can be heard to the Mexican border), followed by WBAI in New York in 1960, KPFT in Houston in 1970, and WPFW (devoted mostly to jazz) in Washington, D.C. in 1977.

Film critic Pauline Kael got her start at Pacifica, and philosopher Alan Watts had a show for two decades. Bob Dylan appeared frequently on WBAI, which became hugely influential.

“Much of what you hear on talk radio today, certainly Howard Stern, stems from the experiments and from the pioneering of WBAI,” Lasar says.

Pacifica pushed boundaries: In 1957 it broadcast a recording of Allan Ginsburg’s profane Beat Generation poem “Howl,” albeit in an awkwardly edited version. In 1973, WBAI broadcast George Carlin’s “Seven Dirty Words” routine and was censured by the FCC. The dispute was resolved by the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled that Carlin’s sketch was indecent — but not obscene. A year later, the Symbionese Liberation Army delivered tape recordings of the kidnapped Patty Hearst to KPFA and KPFK. The FBI demanded that KPFK turn over the tapes, but general manager Will Lewis refused and was thrown in jail.

No other event shaped and galvanized Pacifica in the 1960s more than the Vietnam War. It opposed the war long before Walter Cronkite or any other mainstream media outlet. WBAI’s Chris Koch became the first American to cover the war from Hanoi in 1965, and the station later broadcast the Senate’s Watergate hearings gavel to gavel.

Pacifica’s decline in the late 1970s can be attributed to the end of the Vietnam war and the rise of NPR.

“National Public Radio was kind of a body blow to Pacifica,” Lasar says. “It was a more professional and less strident alternative.”

In Los Angeles, ousted KPFK program director Ruth Hirschman (now Ruth Seymour) built KCRW into a powerhouse. Many of Pacifica’s volunteer programmers were happy to let “corporate” NPR surpass them in listenership; Pacifica was “community radio.”

“The central underlying problem at Pacifica,” Marc Cooper says, “is that in the end, what dictates everything is the individual programmer’s desire to hold onto his or her airtime. Management has always been weak.”

Volunteer hosts with half-hour or hourlong weekly shows viewed them as their personal property. According to legend, one elderly activist tried to will away his time slot when he died.

But most paid news staff, like Cooper, as well as upper management, wanted to professionalize Pacifica and unite in one network. Satellites were becoming affordable enough for Pacifica to produce a network show and beam it to its stations and affiliates, as NPR was doing with All Things Considered.

Pacifica launched Pacifica National News, a national, half-hour newscast, and despite resistance from some stations, especially Berkeley, modernizers pushed ahead in 1996, launching Democracy Now!, an hourlong, guest-oriented show. First designed with a preposterously unwieldy structure, co-hosted by four anchors in four cities, it eventually was consolidated to its two current hosts: Juan González, a New York Daily News columnist, and WBAI’s talented news director, Amy Goodman.

Cooper has plenty of bitterness about Pacifica but saves his real vitriol for Goodman: “Amy’s an evil bitch. Amy would be perfect in the [New Jersey governor Chris] Christie administration. She’s a brass-knuckles fighter.”

The revolution began innocently enough. In the 1980s, tension grew between the modernizers and the local programmers, some of whom had been pushed out for new shows. Others feared they’d be next. It was NIMBY-ism, but with microphones.

In 1999, Pacifica CEO Lynn Chadwick fired KPFA Berkeley general manager Nicole Sawaya. When KPFA staffers asked Chadwick who was in charge, she replied, “I guess I will be for now.”

KPFA was the most insular and provincial station, highly resistant to change or centralization. “The Berkeley station is like an ethnic radio station,” Cooper says. “It speaks Berkeley to everybody with a ponytail and long hair.”

On the air, programmers openly revolted against Chadwick’s maneuver: Every hour they read a one-page statement denouncing Pacifica and calling for the rehire of Sawaya and another host.

Groups of dissident listeners began to form, and disgruntled ex-programmers sprang out of the woodwork, dubbing themselves the “banned and fired.”

Chadwick, to everyone’s amazement, shut down KPFA in Berkeley, had the staff removed by armed guards, cut the live transmitter feed and replaced it with archived shows from Pacifica. The first substituted content was Bus Riders Union founder Eric Mann giving a Marxist analysis of the 1960s.

Protests erupted. No fewer than three lawsuits were filed against the Pacifica board. Ten thousand people marched in Berkeley. Left-wing activists and commentators nationwide, including Howard Zinn, Noam Chomsky and Michael Moore, rushed to KPFA’s defense.

“They create this sweeping narrative: ‘They’re going to corporatize Pacifica and sell off KPFA!’ ” Cooper says. “It’s really science fiction, and the left is so stupid that they bought into it.”

Lasar, however, says otherwise, citing an email that Pacifica National Board member Michael Palmer accidentally sent to an outside group, speculating about the sale of KPFA’s powerful radio signal and estimating it could net up to $75 million.

By now the revolution had spread. Cooper remembers walking up to the KPFK offices on Cahuenga Boulevard near Universal Studios, past a crowd of elderly protesters — “professional bottom-door activists with no life and nothing to do,” he calls them — who accused Cooper of being an agent for the CIA. One sign read, “More activists, less authors.” Cooper says: “That’s about one step removed from Pol Pot. It’s like, ‘Let’s kill everyone with glasses.’ ”

Websites sprang up like wildflowers — Save Pacifica, Save KPFA — three or four at some stations. The just-emerging Internet helped dissidents organize and raise money. They hired a campaign consultant, started a boycott that urged listeners to not pledge money to Pacifica — a threat to the network’s very survival — and demanded that the board resign, to be replaced by a democratically elected board.

Democracy Now! host Amy Goodman joined the fray, siding on the air with the revolutionaries, signing petitions and giving an open microphone to the boycott of the network that was paying her comparatively handsome salary. She essentially became the public face of a movement that was targeting board members and posting leaflets in their neighborhoods, which read: “Wanted for criminal theft of a radio station.”

“These [were] brownshirts,” Cooper says. “And Amy was their leader and she knew it. And I told that to her face: She can fool a lot of people a lot of the time, but I know she’s a thug.” (Goodman did not return several calls for comment.)

On Dec. 12, 2001, three months after the World Trade Center towers fell in New York City, the Pacifica board resigned and cut a deal with the revolutionaries — a legal settlement Lasar says led to “the most excruciatingly democratic bylaws in the history of broadcasting.”

The rebels now had control of an organization mired in chaos and millions of dollars in debt, much of it to lawyers. Bills would pile up higher as the new guard purged many old managers, who had to be given sizable settlements (according to one source, the KPFK general manager’s severance amounted to several hundred thousand dollars).

Hours before the settlement was approved, one of the plaintiffs called Lasar and said, “Matthew, the second-worst thing that could possibly happen has happened: We won.”

Within a few months, Democracy Now! was privatized. In what may have been a reward for Goodman’s support of the revolution, she was handed complete ownership of the show. For free. In fact, they paid her to take it, handing Goodman a contract worth hundreds of thousands of dollars a year — and gave her an automatic 4 percent raise every year, regardless of the size of her listenership or the money she raised.

According to former board member Tracy Rosenberg, Goodman now gets fees of around $650,000 for the right to air her show and for her fundraising services. Rosenberg says: “When you go to business school, they tell you that’s how not to sign a contract.”

Today, Pacifica’s debts amount to roughly $3 million; $2 million of that is owed to Democracy Now!, which is also the name of an independent nonprofit run by Goodman.

“Honestly, I get where she’s coming from,” says Uprising host Sonali Kolhatkar. “Every journalist fantasizes about having their own media institution, and she pulled it off.” She adds that Goodman “fundraises tirelessly for Pacifica, for all five stations — sometimes simultaneously — on top of doing her own show. I have great admiration for her.”

Today, Democracy Now! is a worldwide brand; it has far more listeners via podcasting and syndication than Pacifica itself, which no longer produces any regular national programming.

Goodman may be Pacifica’s biggest creditor, but she’s far from the only drain on its finances. Board elections cost somewhere in the neighborhood of $200,000 — no small price for a network with a $13 million annual budget. The meetings themselves cost about $20,000 each to fly in 20-plus people and put them up for the weekend, and they’re dominated by bickering. Members regularly invoke Robert’s Rules of Order, and can take half an hour simply to approve the minutes of a previous meeting.

“All sorts of machinations come with that,” says elections supervisor Terry Bouricius. “Rather than seeking common ground, the goal is to embarrass and show up the other side rather than to accomplish something.”

Not even the board members can muster anything more than a tepid defense of Pacifica’s bizarre elections. “I’m 50-50 on that one,” influential board member Lydia Brazon says. “They’re costly. But it’s kind of a safety valve for [avoiding] a lawsuit.”

“The concept was noble,” says Bob Hennelly, but “governance is increasingly Byzantine and inward. Right at the time where Pacifica could be more globally relevant, it’s inwardly focused on itself.”

The station’s legal bills are prodigious. According to former board member Tracy Rosenberg, so many wrongful-termination claims have been filed against Pacifica over the last two decades that it pays $250,000 a year to insure against them, a staggering amount for an entity with just 130 employees. And then there’s WBAI, whose transmitter sits high atop the Empire State Building’s spire, at a cost of $50,000 a month.

Yet opportunities abound for Pacifica, probably the single most valuable asset the left has. Its five broadcasting licenses alone could be worth $50 million to $100 million, according to Lasar, and it owns a studio in Berkeley and another on an increasingly pricey stretch of Cahuenga Boulevard in Studio City. WBAI’s license is said to be particularly valuable, since it sits smack dab in the center of the dial at 99.5 FM — choice real estate in the radio industry.

“Right at the moment where satellite radio is booming, where the web is booming, where Pacifica has to worry about the future of terrestrial radio, all of this is lost,” Cooper says. “They’re consumed with eating themselves over a political fight, which in most cases is about continuing the status quo.”

Perhaps the most ominous hurdle lies with Pacifica’s listenership: It’s old.

“You must develop an audience on the other side of 50, or you won’t have a station,” Rosenberg says. “That’s a difficult thing for many Pacificans to get their head around. I get told all the time, ‘Young people don’t have any money, so don’t worry about them.’ I say, ‘Guys, you’re gonna care in 20 years!’ ”

Pacifica is still far to the left of anything else in mass media, and still gives voice to beliefs and ideas found outside the mainstream. It hasn’t changed; the world has.

Decades ago, the left called for Lyndon Johnson’s head. It was against Nixon, but also against Hubert Humphrey.

Today, those to the left of the Democratic Party have been relegated to the fringes — or perhaps they’ve relegated themselves, favoring new-age beliefs over science, seemingly invested in the idea that society is as bad off as it’s ever been.

Pacifica is only a reflection of that shift. It’s still far to the left of anything else in mass media, and still gives voice to beliefs and ideas found outside the mainstream (way outside).

That core ideology hasn’t changed; America has.

Correction: An earlier version of this story misspelled Sasha Futran as Sasha Sutran.”

The LA Weekly‘s piece about the decline of Pacifica is a really terrific read. I’ll pick out a few choice bits at random. First, the ratings:

Pacifica has a long and storied history, and still features such leading liberals as Amy Goodman, the widely known host of Democracy Now! (on which journalists Glenn Greenwald and Jeremy Scahill are frequent guests), but it has fallen on hard times of late. Listenership, according Reese, is “extraordinarily low.” During an average 15-minute period, just 700 people listen to its Los Angeles station, 90.7 FM KPFK, for at least five minutes, according to Nielsen Audio, which monitors radio ratings.

For L.A.’s other public radio stations, KCRW and KPCC, that number is 8,000 and 20,000, respectively. KPFK draws roughly one one-thousandth of all radio listeners in the Metro Los Angeles area.

Pacifica’s New York station, WBAI, is even worse off, with too few listeners to register on the Arbitron rankings, and is all but bankrupt. Last year, most of the staff was laid off, including the entire news department.

Facebook and twitter followers will have heard me complain incessantly about the local NPR station’s pledge drives, which rather than what might think is the mutually beneficially arrangement of interspersing the pledge drive with listenable content like news updates, consist of nothing but people asking for money for days on end. (Does anyone listen to this for more than 3 minutes at time?) But, at least, we’re spared Alex Jones-caliber conspiracy theories:

The rest is here:  http://www.lawyersgunsmoneyblog.com/2014/03/nimby-ism-but-with-microphones

[I, Sue, still want to remind us all that Arbitrons are racist and classist, and don’t give a realistic look at what the “have-nots” are listening to.  Plus at KPFK we are terrible at “branding’.  Listeners focus on the particular show names and don’t always identify KPFK, Powered by the People.  And the Arbitron ratings depend upon a few perfect matching names and slogans only.]

http://www.laweekly.com/news/left-wing-darling-pacifica-radio-is-sliding-into-the-abyss-4521218

Audio, Brian Edwards-Tiekert tells how to prepare and do a book interview

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Can jump to :30 minutes in?

“The best way to cultivate a sensibility of what makes for a good [radio] interview is to pre-tape your interviews and set aside large amounts of time to edit them down to half the length they start at. Because it makes you think really critically about where the wasted language is in that interview, when your questions have gone on too long, when your guest has gone off track, what you can fix with editing and what you can’t, and it cultivates the ear you need to start listening critically to other peoples interviews, to start editing in real time when you are listening to other people’s interviews and then to start editing yourself in real time when you are conducting interviews.”

Audio-KPFA long-time producer and contributor Phyllis Bennis on Mitch Jeserich’s Letters & Politics

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This is a speech given by Phyllis Bennis last night (9/29) on her new book Understanding ISIS and The New Global War on Terror.

Bennis is a career journalist who has been active in the Middle East since the 1970s and who covered the United Nations in the 1980s. In 1987, she witnessed the First Intifada and began to take a serious interest in pro-Palestinian advocacy. …In 1999, Bennis accompanied a group of congressional aides to Iraq, examining the impact of U.S.-led economic sanctions on humanitarian conditions there….

Bennis is a fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies (IPS) in Washington, D.C., and of its offshoot, the Transnational Institute in Amsterdam. At IPS, Bennis directs the New Internationalism Project, which “works primarily on Middle East and United Nations issues,” focusing on “the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the Israeli occupation of Palestine.” The project makes use of “education and activism” in an effort to change American policy and also seeks to “democratize and empower” the UN and free it of “U.S. domination.”[3

https://kpfa.org/episode/letters-and-politics-september-30-2015/

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  • From Stones to Statehood: The Palestinian Uprising (1990);
  • Calling the Shots: How Washington Dominates Today’s UN (2000);
  • Before & After: US Foreign Policy and the September 11th Crisis (2003) [US Policy and the War on Terrorism, 2nd ed.];
  • Challenging Empire: How People, Governments, and the UN Defy US Power (2006);
  • Understanding the Palestinian-Israeli Conflict: A Primer (2009);
  • Ending the Iraq War: A Primer (2009);
  • Understanding the US-Iran Crisis: A Primer (2009);
  • Ending the US War in Afghanistan: A Primer (2010).

Bennis was featured in the 2007 award-winning documentary film Occupation 101

Clips, article on Henry Jacobs, KPFA, KPFK Alan Watts, musicologist

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He was a staff member early at KPFA.  He now runs the archive of Alan Watts, but has a long storied history with avant garde music, world music, music production.

“Henry Jacobs is a living embodiment of the picaresque. He seems to have spent his life playing, but in the process kept inventing things for which his successors got the credit. He was fooling around with spacial sound distribution through loudspeakers before Varese’s Poeme Electronique took the 1959 Brussels World Fair by storm—in fact, he was there at the same time doing his thing in another building. He experimented early with multilayered tape loops, quite independently of Pierre Schaeffer in Paris. His free-form radio collages in the early fifties were a whole decade ahead of John Leonard’s Nightsounds, the program which is authoritatively identified as the first of this kind……”

http://www.kpfahistory.info/dandl/jacobs.html

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Article Pacifica’s Andrew Leslie Phillips, veteran Program Dir. and iGM of WBAI and KPFA

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 ~6 pages_

“Riding the waves at Pacifica radio, by Andrew Leslie Phillips 8/13

Andrew Leslie Phillips has written a short history of the Pacifica radio network, published below. He is interim general manager of Pacifica station KPFA in Berkeley, California.
Phillips is a native of Australia. He spent seven years in Papua New Guinea as a government patrol officer, radio journalist and filmmaker before coming to New York in 1975. He produced award-winning investigative radio documentaries on a wide range of environmental and political issues for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, and for Pacifica station WBAI in New York City. He taught journalism, radio and “sound image” as an adjunct professor at New York University for 10 years.
The Pacifica foundation was founded in 1946 by poet and journalist Lewis Hill and a small group of pacifists, intellectuals and experienced radio people. They did not have the same political or economic philosophy but shared a vision which supported a peaceful world, social justice and creativity. ….
FM was a new, technology and Pacifica was backing the future, inventing an entirely new funding mechanism – the theory of listener sponsored radio. . . .
Equality of access to airtime has always been at the center of controversy at Pacifica and community radio everywhere. Most on-air people at Pacifica were not paid until the mid 1990’s. They volunteered and they made money to support the Foundation by pitching their programming on free-speech Pacifica radio. That was the deal. It was a tacit agreement – Pacifica provides opportunity and access whilst producers agreed to pitch and encourage on air pledges. By far the largest percentage of financial support for Pacifica still comes from listener donations.[2]. . . ”
http://www.radiosurvivor.com/2013/08/06/riding-the-waves-at-pacifica-radio-by-andrew-leslie-phillips/

?

?

September 16 2015

  • Andrew Leslie Phillips
    Andrew Leslie Phillips [in a negative mood]: “I know many who follow this page [https://www.facebook.com/groups/PacRadioSupporters/] are, have been or aspire to “run” Pacifica but most of you are not qualified and there are too many of you on overcrowded ineffectual boards. I know why this clumsy governance system was originally implemented but it has not worked. We all know that now. Pacifica as an institution was always a tenuous affair but never more so than now. There seems little point to the institution any longer. The audience is old and growing older, the programming in most cases, second rate. Most information Pacifica carries is available elsewhere. Pacifica has been nit-picked to death by competing factions. I believe there maybe a place for individual stations to strike out on their own but the governance structure stands in the way of that. I spent some great years at WBAI (1979-1993) and in those days WBAI and Pacifica meant something. We did ground breaking programming and produced many fine producers, a lot of whom can now be heard on NPR (since there was no future even then at Pacifica, for talented broadcasters so they moved on). Amy Goodman may have been the best “thing” to come out of Pacifica (and Amy was forced out by noxious WBAI management) and when Amy say’s “From Pacifica” in her DemNow intro she is not really saying it as it is because DemNow comes “from Pacifica” only because Michael Yoshida at KPFA ensures DemNow get on the satellite on time every day. During my tenure at KPFA (2011-2013) I came to like and respect many in that community. But I too was skewered by some who came to disagree with me and manipulated me out of my position with unfounded accusations and deception. Unfortunately Pacifica under its current charter breeds a kind of Machiavellian environment and John Proffitt is just another victim.”

Article by a long-time skilled, experienced Volunteer, still relevant

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kpfplayoffthepnbThe following is an interesting article-response that I mostly disagree with:

“PNB and staff criticized in LA Indymedia article, response with info is here:

This is a reposting from an article in www.la.indymedia that was in response to allegations and accusations made by another author who chose to remain anonymous – while freely making declarations against both the PNB, specific staff and board members, and named individuals who may need to realize their names are thus used.

Title of that article is :
Pacifica’s Current Board Structure is Destroying the Network
written by Concerned Pacifican
Monday, Sep. 28, 2009 at 5:19 PM {URL is below}
the article can be found at :
http://la.indymedia.org/news/2009/09/230683_comment.php#230721

http://pacificana.org/2009/09/30/pnb-and-staff-criticized-la-indymedia-article-response-info-here

Title: Network
by Terry Goodman Wednesday,
Sep. 30, 2009 at 4:05 PM
tgoodman4@roadrunner.com

As is typical of anonymous Indymedia acticles about Pacifica, the piece “Pacifica’s Current Board Structure is Destroying the Network” is biased, presenting misinformation as fact to manipulate opinion. Such articles reflecting a narrow ideological interpretation of historical events commonly appear in the middle of each Pacifica delegate election period. This refutation attempts to balance those distortions with accuracy.

There is certainly little doubt that Pacifica’s current board structure has problems or that the network is in distress, but the true causes of the network’s disfunction actually predate its democratization. The original article is also generally correct in its central claim that a long-sought purge is underway. But what those primarily responsible for the network’s problems now call an assault on everything good and decent is viewed by others as the long-delayed remedy to persistent mismanagement and the long-needed implementation of needed reform — i.e, the success of the democratic governance model.”

KPFT Founder Ray Hill and history of FM Radio

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“About my returning to The Prison Show this Friday: www.kpft.org is in its Fall fund raising mode and I want all of you to consider offering your $$$ help. In 1968 in a small office on Bissonet four of us: Larry Lee, Don Gardner, Debra Danburg (then just a child prodigy U of H student) and I were plotting to give Houston a vehicle of free speech on the radio. From that came KPFT. The station became the vehicle for Wilde n Stein our pioneering GLBT program (evolved now into Queer Voices and After Hours) In 1980, I became the first openly gay and first ex-convict to be authorized to be general manager of an FCC licensed station in the country and began The Prison Show, an iconic effort at expanding to an otherwise neglected audience. The station needs and deserves your tax deductible support and you can support The Prison Show now on the KPFT web page or listen Friday and call a pledge into the station.”
~Ray Hill

Tune in Houston’s community public radio station- KPFT 90.1 FM
May 9, 2014
This today from KPFT founder, Ray Hill:

“I borrowed this note from Writer’s Almanac and would add that in 1949 Lewis Hill and a few friends began non-commercial FM broadcasting in the San Fransisco Bay Area leading to the founding of KPFT, Houston in March 1970. She is still there globally at www.kpft.org Where The Prison Show will be broadcast tonight at 9:00 pm Houston Time. Listen up and support.

On May 13, 1939, the oldest commercial FM radio station in the United States made its first broadcast from Meriden, Connecticut. FM — or “frequency modulation” — radio was the brainchild of Edwin H. Armstrong, a radio pioneer who had been designing technical improvements to radio broadcasters and receivers for many years. Radio signals were transmitted using “amplitude modulation,” and although AM radio signals traveled great distances, they were full of static and the quality was poor. Armstrong tried varying the frequency of the radio waves, rather than their amplitude, and the signal became much clearer. Armstrong received a patent for FM radio in 1933, and in 1934 he broadcast an organ recital from the top of the Empire State Building over both AM and FM frequencies, so people could hear the difference for themselves.

While FM was being perfected, a few experimental radio stations were trying to increase the quality of the AM signal. These were known as “Apex” stations, in part because their transmitting antennas were so tall. One of these Apex stations, W1XPW, was licensed to Franklin Doolittle in 1936. He built his station atop West Peak, in Meriden, Connecticut, and first began his test broadcasts on this date in 1939. By the time the station began full public programming six months later, it was broadcasting on the new FM band, under the call letters WDRC-FM. It’s still on the air, serving listeners in the Hartford area, 75 years later.”

Edwin Joseph Jesús Johnston's photo.

Herbert Hoover on Radio

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http://www.radiosurvivor.com/2015/08/03/herbert-hoovers-warnings-about-radio/

“Hoover was a staunch believer in public control of the airwaves. He wrote that when he arrived at the Harding Administration in 1920, radio broadcasting developers wanted regulation to prevent interference with each other, but “many of them were insisting on a right of permanent preemption of the channels through the air as private property – a monopoly of enormous financial value.” Mr. Secretary thought this was crazy. Their arguments for total privatization were “in a fashion comparable to private ownership of a water navigation channel,” he wrote.”

kpfphooveronradio

KPFK sponsors Chris Hedges

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Yesterday at 2:04pm · Edited ·Chris Hedges is speaking on Sunday evening in Orange County along with Jill Stein and others; it promises to be one of the most memorable evenings of radical solidarity behind the Orange Curtain! One of the world’s most trenchant contemporary social critics, Mr. Hedges is a brilliant, powerful writer; but he’s on another plain altogether as a speaker – you simply have to experience it first hand. Rebel souls will be converging on Santa Ana Sunday evening at the Delhi Center – all the info you need can be found on KPFK’s website – see you on Sunday!
KPFK 90.7 FM Los Angeles / 98.7 FM Santa Barbara's photo.

KPFA co-founder Richard Moore passes

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 http://www.mercurynews.com/entertainment/ci_27864338/poet-filmmaker-richard-moore-co-founder-kpfa-and
Poet and filmmaker Richard Moore, a co-founder of public radio station KPFA and a former president and chief executive of public television station KQED, died of natural causes March 25 at his home in Mill Valley. He was 95.”
MERCURYNEWS.COM

Pacifica 2015-09-14

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September 15 at 10:30pm · Fresno, CA · Edited
The full email from John Proffitt to Stephen Cohen.
—-Original Message—–

From: John Proffitt < ed@pacifica.org>
To: Stephen D Cohen < patfansdc@aol.com>
Sent: Tue, Sep 15, 2015 9:41 am
Subject: Re: OUR COLLECTIVE SADNESS AT YOUR DEPARTURE AND HOW YOU CAN HELP US

Dear Dr. Cohen,

Thank you for your letter — I do appreciate hearing from you.

My reasons for departing are fairly simple and twofold: (1) family responsibilities and (2) a clash of culture between Pacifica and myself. That clash makes it impossible for me to be effective in this job, thus my decision to resign.

In my opinion, the historic and deep-seated problems of Pacifica can only be addressed through consensus within the Pacifica family, which is not going to happen given the current poisonous factional atmosphere, burdened with personal attacks, paranoia, obsession with conspiracy theories and other historical baggage that has, in effect, rendered Pacifica ungovernable.

I care very deeply about the history, legacy and role that Pacifica should be playing in American life, so perhaps after some of the dust has cleared I will go into detail as to my recommendations and thoughts for a way forward.

Regards,

John Proffitt

 Lydia Brazon will become iED on or before Oct 14th.

From: John Proffitt
Sent: Sep 14, 2015 1:09 PM
To: Pacifica National Board , Janet Kobren , Quincy McCoy , Berthold Reimers , Duane Bradley , Leslie Radford , Jerry Paris
Subject: My departure

To the Pacifica National Board
To the Pacifica General Managers

Today I have submitted my letter of resignation as Executive Director to the PNB Chair, Lydia Brazon. My last day will be on or before October 14th.

I am deeply appreciative of the opportunity — the privilege — I’ve had to work with you as your Executive Director. I’ve come to know and appreciate many for your professionalism and dedication to Pacifica, and I want to thank in particular my National Office colleagues Lydia Brazon, Margy Wilkinson, Jon Almeleh, Efren Llarinas and LaSchele Moseley.

I wish the very best for Pacifica, its staff, volunteers and supporters!

John

John Gladney Proffitt
Executive Director
Pacifica Foundation Radio
1925 Martin Luther King Jr Way
Berkeley CA 94704-1037
Office – 510.849.2590 x 208″
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Article from the LA Times 1992 on African Mental Liberation Weekend

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KPFK Confronts Charges of Anti-Semitism : Radio: The non-commercial FM station plans programs on multiculturalism while urging employees not to discuss ‘black-Jewish relations’ in broadcasts.

February 29, 1992|CLAUDIA PUIG | TIMES STAFF WRITER
    • In the wake of a charge that it broadcast an anti-Semitic program, KPFK-FM (90.7) is scrambling to smooth over the controversy by planning future programs on multiculturalism and holding a meeting with Los Angeles County human relations officials. In the meantime, management at the non-commercial station has warned staffers not to discuss the issue on the air.
    • http://articles.latimes.com/1992-02-29/entertainment/ca-2630_1_black-jewish-relations

Video-Alice Walker at KPFA’s Peace Awards

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8:50 minutes

Part 5 of KPFA On The Air, 8:22 minutes, where Alice Walker fought for KPFA, saying “this is something that is precious, this is something that is ours, this is something that we paid for, this is something we believe in, and this is something we intend to keep.”  Word had spread that Pacifica had considered selling KPFA, and 10,000 people took to the streets in front of KPFA.

kpfaaliceWalkerintendtokeep

KPFK Youth For and By

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SUNRISE SET w/ @souloverse goin IN. This is what the love of groove sounds like. Tune In. 90.7FM KPFK :: #losangeles #radio #KPFK #DJ #producer #longbeach #analog #live #love #fujifilm #xt10

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LIVE w/ @souloverse goin in for the sunrise set on DANK RADIO’s 11 Year Celebration on Aziatik Rhythmz @kpfk :: 90.7FM LA :: #losangeles #onair #KPFK #dankradio #aziatikrhythmz #DJ #producer #music #radio #anniversary #thankyou #love #community

LIVE w/ @souloverse on 90.7FM LA @kpfk :: worldwide stream on www.kpfk.org :: #losangeles #radio #dankradio #live #goodmorning #interview #longbeach #losangeles #studiocity

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#FBF :: As we level up into 11 years of being On Air via Aziatik Rhythmz on @kpfk, we pay tribute to our original musical endeavor that got us the keys to all the doors we open today. The legend of sun doominal will forever be the portal into anew world of creation… :: #dankradio #sundoominal #DIY #community #radio #aziatikrhythmz #KPFK #flashbackfriday

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Dank Radio

#TBT :: before we closed out the night w/ sunrise sets on the radio, we were opening nights at the local bars. this is a photo of our first SUN DOOMINAL show at the original Blue Cafe LB on the promenade. Shoutout to Scott from Mambo Studios who gave us kids a place to play some loud music! the very very first catalyst for a wave of momentum. :: Circa Early 2000s :: #throwbackthursday #dankradio #sundoominal #bluecafe #LBC #DTLB #punkrock #DIY

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Tonight @dankradio is back at @thebrasslamp for another installment of #l_i_s_t_e_n. Celebrating @neonphoenix’s #birthday alongside @jodyg4d @andymx7. $5 Cover. #losangeles #longbeach #music #dankradio #love

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'Hittin' the radio waves again this weekend. Got one of the most trusted ears in the scene LAVASHAK aka @[208917432775006:274:Mango Disco Records] on the decks to share some special selections.'

'LIVE & DIRECT! :: KPFK 90.7FM Los Angeles & worldwide stream at www.kpfk.org'

Videos

From 1999, History

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Excerpt from:  “FAIR Fairness And Accuracy In Reporting

Oct 1 1999

Selling Off Pacifica

 The U.S. media system has very few places where dissenting voices can be regularly heard, unconstrained by the interests of corporate owners or the censorship of advertiser dependence. There may be no more important exceptions to this rule than the five radio stations owned by the Pacifica Foundation–the Bay Area’s KPFA, Los Angeles’ KPFK, New York’s WBAI, D.C.’s WPFW and Houston’s KPFT. But how long these stations will continue to exist is very much an open question.

Pacifica has long been torn by charges that its national board, led by U.S. Civil Rights Commission chief Mary Frances Berry, is bent on taking the network in a more timid, ratings-driven, commercialized direction. Tensions mounted in February 1999, when the board completed a centralization of power that stripped away any governing role from the stations’ local advisory boards. Further protests were provoked on March 31, when popular KPFA station manager Nicole Sawaya was let go, and when long-time Pacifica host Larry Bensky was fired for discussing Sawaya’s ouster on-air, in apparent defiance of Pacifica‘s “dirty laundry” rule.

But perhaps the most damaging crisis at Pacifica was sparked by the accidental release of an email message from Pacifica board member (and Berry ally) Micheal Palmer–a message indicating that the sale of one or more stations might be on the Pacifica agenda. . . . ”