Category Archives: KPFT

KPFT Founder Ray Hill and history of FM Radio

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“About my returning to The Prison Show this Friday: www.kpft.org is in its Fall fund raising mode and I want all of you to consider offering your $$$ help. In 1968 in a small office on Bissonet four of us: Larry Lee, Don Gardner, Debra Danburg (then just a child prodigy U of H student) and I were plotting to give Houston a vehicle of free speech on the radio. From that came KPFT. The station became the vehicle for Wilde n Stein our pioneering GLBT program (evolved now into Queer Voices and After Hours) In 1980, I became the first openly gay and first ex-convict to be authorized to be general manager of an FCC licensed station in the country and began The Prison Show, an iconic effort at expanding to an otherwise neglected audience. The station needs and deserves your tax deductible support and you can support The Prison Show now on the KPFT web page or listen Friday and call a pledge into the station.”
~Ray Hill

Tune in Houston’s community public radio station- KPFT 90.1 FM
May 9, 2014
This today from KPFT founder, Ray Hill:

“I borrowed this note from Writer’s Almanac and would add that in 1949 Lewis Hill and a few friends began non-commercial FM broadcasting in the San Fransisco Bay Area leading to the founding of KPFT, Houston in March 1970. She is still there globally at www.kpft.org Where The Prison Show will be broadcast tonight at 9:00 pm Houston Time. Listen up and support.

On May 13, 1939, the oldest commercial FM radio station in the United States made its first broadcast from Meriden, Connecticut. FM — or “frequency modulation” — radio was the brainchild of Edwin H. Armstrong, a radio pioneer who had been designing technical improvements to radio broadcasters and receivers for many years. Radio signals were transmitted using “amplitude modulation,” and although AM radio signals traveled great distances, they were full of static and the quality was poor. Armstrong tried varying the frequency of the radio waves, rather than their amplitude, and the signal became much clearer. Armstrong received a patent for FM radio in 1933, and in 1934 he broadcast an organ recital from the top of the Empire State Building over both AM and FM frequencies, so people could hear the difference for themselves.

While FM was being perfected, a few experimental radio stations were trying to increase the quality of the AM signal. These were known as “Apex” stations, in part because their transmitting antennas were so tall. One of these Apex stations, W1XPW, was licensed to Franklin Doolittle in 1936. He built his station atop West Peak, in Meriden, Connecticut, and first began his test broadcasts on this date in 1939. By the time the station began full public programming six months later, it was broadcasting on the new FM band, under the call letters WDRC-FM. It’s still on the air, serving listeners in the Hartford area, 75 years later.”

Edwin Joseph Jesús Johnston's photo.
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KPFT was bombed off the air twice by the KKK, recognition

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KPFT was bombed (for the first time) 45 years ago this week 5/11/15

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Three Klansman were arrested in the bombing. Jimmy Dale Hutto of Pasadena, the only person to stand trial in the bombings, was arrested on his way to California, where he allegedly planned to blow up KPFT’s sister stations KPFA in Berkeley and KPFK in Los Angeles. Hutto was convicted in 1971 and sent to prison. The other two suspects testified for the government and never stood trial.

http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/article/KPFT-was-bombed-for-the-first-time-45-years-ago-6256126.php

KPFT’s PD Ernesto Aguilar article on Truthout about Pacifica

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http://www.truth-out.org/speakout/item/29625-pacifica-stands-in-for-all-public-media

Ernesto Aguilar is program director for Pacifica’s Houston station KPFT. He also sits on the board of directors of the National Federation of Community Broadcasters, the country’s largest and oldest network of  community media outlets.

Here’s a quote from Melody Kramer: “A key to fostering new connections may be finding ways that create lifelong associations that don’t start with money, she remarks. Inevitably new listeners may give, but there has to be a hook that gets them interested. Self-identifying with non-commercial media listening creates its own form of community, Kramer points out, and social experiences with others have many appeals. “For people not into the bar scene and who aren’t religious, there are not a lot of options,” [Melody] Kramer adds. “Public broadcasters can make spaces where listeners can be involved, almost as cruise ship directors, connecting people and extracting themselves.”

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In KPFT

Audio, Video: KPFT has a prison show

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Prison Show host and former inmate David Babb takes to the air every Friday night at 9 p.m. to deliver news about the Texas penal system and to take calls from listeners, who often have messages for their incarcerated loved ones.

The Prison Show  July 4, 2014
VOA News – The Prison Show
Houston Radio Show Helps Prisoners and Loved Ones
Voice of America
In addition to the regular staff, “The Prison Show” counts on a number of expert guests who discuss subjects like prison health care, legal issues and …http://www.voanews.com/content/houston-radio-show-helps-prisoners-and-loved-ones/1950623.html
— with Mike Lewis, Dennis Price, David Atwood, Hank Lamb, David Collingsworth, Karen Damico, Michael Allen, Holly R. Carmen and Frank T. Dewey at 90.1 FM KPFT Houston.

7:11   http://www.npr.org/2012/01/16/144970513/the-prison-show-helps-texas-inmates-find-escape

http://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/article/KPFT-s-Prison-Show-gets-perfect-new-host-3797229.php#src=fb